User avatar
By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4921817
Didn't you do something similar with your build but used magnets in the tube and in the pack?
Not really. I used a step but to cut a loom sized hole in the gearbox. I did use magnets to secure. With yours being half solid, figured you’d not want to bore through it.
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User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4921818
I purchased a kit from Ben last year and was a bit apprehensive about drilling that gearbox hole, as well.

I ended up using a 1” drill hole punch attachment — the same one to drill for your loom that connects to your wand. I ended up securing it to a hand bit-driver and hand-cranked the punch. It was a lot of elbow grease, but it was gentle on the pack. (Lots of horror stories of people drilling too deeply and cracking their shell or making a hole!)

Once I got that in about an inch or two, I could see the cut I was making from the inside of the pack. From there I used my dremel to cut (gently!) into the hole punch cut.

I hope that made sense. The loom didn’t need any dowels or magnets or anything to sit in there nicely. I ended up just gorilla gluing the loom on the inside along with a zip tie to prevent it from back out, should the glue fail.

Hope this helps! Worst case scenario: bondo and some sanding!
Thanks for the reply. I will look into this too.
User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4921851
I purchased a kit from Ben last year and was a bit apprehensive about drilling that gearbox hole, as well.

I ended up using a 1” drill hole punch attachment — the same one to drill for your loom that connects to your wand. I ended up securing it to a hand bit-driver and hand-cranked the punch. It was a lot of elbow grease, but it was gentle on the pack. (Lots of horror stories of people drilling too deeply and cracking their shell or making a hole!)

Once I got that in about an inch or two, I could see the cut I was making from the inside of the pack. From there I used my dremel to cut (gently!) into the hole punch cut.

I hope that made sense. The loom didn’t need any dowels or magnets or anything to sit in there nicely. I ended up just gorilla gluing the loom on the inside along with a zip tie to prevent it from back out, should the glue fail.

Hope this helps! Worst case scenario: bondo and some sanding!
I hope to stay away from having to repair anything as I'm still apprehensive to make any huge change to the plan. Thanks for the information!
By alleyradb
#4921856
I recommend finding a washer that is the diameter of the beam line cylinder and using that as a template for your hole. You should have about 1/8” around the perimeter where the loom is inserted into the gearbox.

Mark the washer hole and then use that hole saw. There’s a screw tip on the one I purchased that made for easy centering.

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I bought that at OSH, but Home Depot and ACE carry them as well. I think I was maybe $10. You’ll also need a 3/4” hole saw for your ribbon cable hole — save yourself a return trip to the hardware store and buy both simultaneously!
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User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4921882
When you tackle it some photos would be great as this is something (fingers crossed) I’m going to be looking at soon!
I wish I would have seen this beforehand. I've opened that area of the pack already without these tools. I used a small drill bit in the center and then would open it further with the next biggest one and so on. Once it was bit enough, I used a Dremel and worked the rest out slowly until I could get the loom in. Since the curve of the gearbox is not hollow, I had to keep in mind what others had happened to them and not Dremel through the shell. Taking my time was a huge factor in this. I'll get a picture up soon as the primer is drying on the pack and parts at the moment. I haven't documented this as well as others have. I need to change that moving forward and share as much as possible. Everyone here has been so helpful so far and I want to be able to give back as well in the future. Since the loom has to bend rather quickly out of the gearbox, I may use a short dowel in the line and Bondo it solid in the pack.

How long is this hose line supposed to be from tube to gearbox?
User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922057
These were taken two days ago as I'm still priming and getting a base before taping up my pack to paint.

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Using a satin finish on the metal parts first and will be giving a second coat tonight after work. The rest of the parts will get the same paint as well.

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With the ion arm, I took inspiration from bishop and used a similar technique when painting it. I allowed some of the bar to get paint on it. While using gloves, I then smeared the paint with my gloved hand until it became sticky. This was a great idea and thanks for sharing this. I like the way that it is looking.

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As for the lenses for the cyclotron, I'm still in debate with myself to use a Dremel or orbital sander to shrink the size of these lenses down to fit the holes. These lenses are the ones that I have purchased from Spongeface with his TVG board.
The washer seen in the picture is a perfect snug fit in the holes of the pack. I am going to attempt to make them smaller so I don't have to attempt a technique to widen the recessed hole in the pack which I am not comfortable in doing.

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Next up will be to paint the parts of the pack and prep the pack for a coat of truck bed liner paint. I like the look that others have used in the past so I'm going to test it on something else first to see if it's worth doing. Otherwise, I'll be taping the pack tonight to be painted so I can focus on the booster tube and Ion block installation on the pack. This will be my first use of Bondo on the pack. I have to start somewhere as I will need to use it on the wand too when I get to it. Just thinking about it, my mind is starting to drift to all of the other things to do in the future for this pack.
User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922239
Quick update, grinding the lenses down took a bit of time but it turned out great. The power cell lense I used a cutting disc on the Dremel to resize it and then rounded the corners a bit and it fit great as well. I measured the power cell window first and made sure to draw the lines on the acrylic lens with a thick black sharpie marker. I made sure the lines were a little bigger than the lense because of the recessed section the lens sits in. With the cutting disc technique, I put down a thick piece of cardboard first and then would cut through just a bit along the lines. I kept doing this until I touched the cardboard. The cut was pretty clean but I still took a sanding bit to smooth it out a bit. I didn't get any images of the cut on the power cell though.

You can see the size that the lense was and how much I sanded them down to.

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I've left the protective material on for now but the lenses fit flush in their recessed places. More to come.
User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922304
Great progress. Keep us posted. I'm excited for more pictures!
I definitely will. The last 1/2 of this week was painting and working on the lenses.

I have 1 4" speaker as of now and I'm waiting on my pack to dry so I thought I would start working on the internals a bit or at least map it out. Was it worth mounting two speakers in your pack? With the 2 speakers, did you need any extra batteries or hardware to run both? Did you run the speakers parallel or series?
User avatar
By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4922309
My opinion is the 2 speaker setup is well worth it. But if you have concern, I’d recommend grabbing a set of the larger 5-1/2” speakers from a retailer like Walmart and hook up. Test. Then test the 4” speaker. If you don’t notice a difference, return the speakers.

No extra power required to run.
Last edited by bishopdonmiguel on August 11th, 2019, 10:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922311
My option is the 2 speaker setup is well worth it. But if you have concern, I’d recommend grabbing a set of the larger 5-1/2” speakers from a retailer like Walmart and hook up. Test. Then test the 4” speaker. If you don’t notice a difference, return the speakers.

No extra power required to run.
Thanks for the quick reply about this. I will pick up some speakers and give it a go.
User avatar
By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4922317
By the way, the sound board is designed to work with speakers 4-8 ohms. If you get 4 ohm speakers, wire in series for 8 ohms. If you get 8 ohm speakers (unlikely), wire in parallel for 4 ohms.
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User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922333
1st use of Bondo and the Ion block. This reminds me of putting my Stormtrooper armor together as I had one shot with the plastic welder at that time. It turned out better than I thought. As most have done in the past, marked up the section of the pack and the underside of the Ion block 1st with a grinding bit from the Dremel. After which, mixed up the Bondo and applied a layer on the pack corner and the underside of the Ion arm. Then used a square to make sure the block was flush with each edge. I then waited about 5-10 minutes and then flipped the pack over and drilled through the pack and the block at the same time. Finished attaching the block by driving in the 5.5mm self-taping roof screws.

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You can see the 1st two holes that I drilled as a result of not thinking the process through. I originally thought to pre-drill the 2 holes in the pack, then hold the Ion block to the pack and mark the holes on the bottom of the block. Ya....that didn't work as well as I thought it would. Putting the Bondo on plugged those holes with no problem.

I hope to get the booster tube attached tonight as well. I will be getting a block of wood placed snuggly inside at the right depth to expose the plug correctly.

On a side note, these images do not do it justice as the two-toned with satin and truck bed liner looks really sharp.

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User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922566
Very nice work indeed!
Thanks a bunch, Mario! I've actually been rather busy on the build since my last post. I've attached a good number of the accessories to the pack minus tubing and some make-shift Clippard elbows. I didn't purchase the actual pieces so I have some painting to do.

This is a list of everything that I have attached since painting:

Ion Block
Injector tubes
Booster Tube
Booster Later
Painted/Weathered resisters
Painted Clippard 331 (pack)

I need to prime the Clippard elbows bases so I may paint them gold.

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I had my first oops that I'm not sure how to fix or if I should worry about it at all. You can see that the PPD is a bit high. All measurements seemed to be correct but now after attaching it, you can see it is a little high and not flush. The image below you can't tell from that angle though. I just liked that angle :)

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Elbow added to the Ion block. Tapped the hole and screwed it in.

Here I added some brown leather paint to the resisters to give them a weathered look.

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Before...
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After
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For anyone that has used resin resistors instead of the actual ones, what was the method of attaching the hoses to them? Or any ideas?

Next will be to work on gear box and tubing.
canpara liked this
By alleyradb
#4922595
Prior to purchasing the genuine resistors, I just drilled holes into the replicas and used a bit of glue to hold them in place. You need only drill into them an 1/2” or so.

Alternatively, you could drill holes and insert small wood or metal dowels to slip your hoses over to better replicate the real resistors.
User avatar
By Fitzhume
#4922608
Prior to purchasing the genuine resistors, I just drilled holes into the replicas and used a bit of glue to hold them in place. You need only drill into them an 1/2” or so.

Alternatively, you could drill holes and insert small wood or metal dowels to slip your hoses over to better replicate the real resistors.
I like the small dowel idea, that way it can resemble the same type of hose setup from the genuine resistors. Thanks for the suggestion!

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