User avatar
By Jairus
#136315
Does anyone know if something like this would work on a Black Nomex?
No. Nomex is synthetic. It will not lighten significantly or take dye. I've been repeating this until I'm blue in the face in multiple threads.

I repeat:
Nomex is synthetic. It will NOT significantly lighten OR take dye. Ever.
User avatar
By RuBain
#136412
If that's the case why is it I've seen people talking about dyeing their desert tan nomex's to a something a little more grey?
Because they still end up khaki at the end, with a barely noticeable gray depending on the lighting. I would assume with a black nomex, very little to color would show, if any, as Jarius said previously. If you're very picky about your suit color, get a tru-spec or rothco. Otherwise, just get a black nomex and call it good.
User avatar
By Jairus
#136487
RIT dye does not work well on synthetic fibers; it states as much on the back of the package. The most you can hope to do is tint the suit.
Nomex is a synthetic material, and as such does not take dye very well at all. The most you can hope to do is tint it,
You also shouldn't have to dye a Nomex suit, and it is indeed fairly difficult to do much more than tint one.
User avatar
By kind2311
#142961
Coming soon.
I was able to get my black Tru-Spec to a suitable GB2 Charcoal Gray using Bleach, RIT Liquid Navy Blue and Dark Green dyes and some really hot water.

If you cant do this on a stove or over a flame then it is very important in all steps that you have the water as hot as your house's hot water heater can get it, so go find it and turn its temperature up all the way . . .and be sure to warn others in the house that you have done so and also be sure to turn it back down when you're done . . . :blush:


Instructions:

Wash and dry the suit several times with fabric softener sheets before attempting to bleach/dye

Use at least 2 cups of bleach in a medium load of VERY HOT water, repeat if necessary until the entire suit is an even reddish/brown color.

Dye with 1/2 bottle each of RIT Liquid Navy Blue and Dark Green dyes, following the prep instructions on the bottle. Let the suit agitate in the dye bath for about 30 min, then shut off the washer and pull the suit out slightly and un-twist the arms and legs that have surely become twisted with the agitation, then let the suit soak for without agitation 30 min. Then turn the washer back on its longest wash cycle and let it finish.

After the washer completes it's full cycle, take the suit outside and hose it down good until the water running out of the suit is clear.

Check against reference pics both outside in the sun and inside with camera flash on and off.


I had to bleach my Tru-Spec 3 times before I got an even color removal. I think this is due to not using enough bleach and not having the water hot enough at first. If I had to do this again, I would probably use 2 or 3 boxes of RIT color remover instead of bleach, just to see which worked better.

It may take more than one dye bath to bring it to on-screen color. If you dye and find out that the suit still has a red tint then dye again with a little more green to neutralize the red.

If the suit turns out too green then just add some blue. very easy.

Image

Image
User avatar
By Spooky
#147447
I don't think bleach would be a good idea

Try soaking it with 2 boxes of color remover first rinse and let it dry
Then try giving it a splash of black I'd say around 2 or 3 ounces

Someone else may have some different advice, but this is what I was thinking about trying.
User avatar
By JayM
#148337
Yeah I found out about the nomex from my own experience. I tried dyeing my khaki nomex to GB2 using a mix of some black with more purple and dark blue. The khaki nomex turned a bit gray and then when I washed it, all of the dye came right out being completely rejected.
User avatar
By shodanmark
#148379
Will this be any use removing the blue from my tru-spec? It's the only thing I've found on Amazon UK. It does say not for use on Polyester though... what do you think?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dylon-Fabric-Co ... 168&sr=8-2

Another one on there is a "colour run" remover.
User avatar
By Spooky
#148383
I would say to not use the Pre-Dye stuff. Since it says it is not suitable for polyester that means it could either have no results or end up destroying the fabric making it pointless in either direction. The color run remover may work...
What you really need is something similar to this http://www.ritdye.com/Fabric+Treatments ... 7.49.lasso
User avatar
By Spooky
#148503
Depends I did what you are asking with a Rothco but it was an older one that was 65% poly blend
The process should generally be the same but if it is more cotton (which can take more dye then man made fibers) you may end up with some different results.

http://www.gbfans.com/community/viewtop ... =4&t=14410

Check that out for the results
Here is the recipe

Step one: Sink 3/4 full of near boiling water two packets of color remover for 30 mins
remove and rise
Let dry

Step two: Sink filled the same way
2oz Denim dye
2oz navy
4oz black
Soak and stir for about 45 mins
Rise quickly, squeeze out excess and dry

step 3:
This last bath was:Sink 3/4 full
4oz Navy
1/2 oz denim
Soak for 30 mins and squeeze excess then dry

If it is mostly cotton we can probably tweek that for a better result or to go slower to make sure you don't over dye it. But like I said it is very possible that will turn out perfect.
User avatar
By Jairus
#149390
What do you recommend if I were going to be using a full cotton Rothco for hot weather?
Taking the presented recipes and using roughly half the amount of dye with roughly half the dying times. You'll need to experiment.

Where are you finding full cotton Rothcos?
User avatar
By Spooky
#149397
I'm not under the impression that they make them...they make mostly cotton blends now but not full
For those no matter what color you wanna take a little of the dye out, soak less for less time or cut a step. But that is all argumentative
By creamyiraq
#151335
I royally failed in dyeing my Rothco, though I can't figure out how. My suit turned out the maroon color like Rayban's did. I followed all the steps exactly, but after the last dry it was still very dark. I put it in the wash and it washed out a majority of the dye and it was more of a brown. I washed it again then bleached it for about 20 minutes (it had a very light brown color) and then dyed again. After going through the steps its still very dark, more purple now than maroon. I'm wondering if it is because of how old the suit is or if I just did something completely wrong that I'm missing.
By creamyiraq
#156821
I actually managed to re-dye the suit and make it semi-accurate on my 3rd try. I pretty much went at it willy-nilly and hope that it turned out okay, and it went well. I figured I'd share my method in case someone else does what I did and ends up with a purple/maroon color instead of the gray.

First I soaked the suit in the washer with hot water and 2 cups of bleach for 30 minutes, then ran it through the cycle. After doing that the suit was a light brown color. Then I refilled the washer with hot water and added a packet of RIT color remover to the wash, then ran the cycle straight through without any soaking. This time it had a greenish hue to it, but was for the most part gray.

I hit a bit of a snag in this next part. I reloaded the wash, again with hot water, and poured in 1/2 cup of blue dye into the wash, then added the suit. I reset the cycle to run for 30 minutes. After this the suit was starting to turn a nice gray/blue, but was still very light and had some green spots still. I decided to run the wash again (4 washes total) with the remaining 1/2 cup of dye and around 1/2 cup of salt. After running the cycle the suit was nearly perfect. I put it in the dryer for around 20 minutes, and what came out was pretty close to the charcoal gray/blue color I was looking for.

Like I said, this was basically a big trial and error experiment, so by no means should these steps be followed before consulting someone smarter than I at dyeing fabrics. =P
User avatar
By Ron Daniels
Moderator
#156846
I actually managed to re-dye the suit and make it semi-accurate on my 3rd try. I pretty much went at it willy-nilly and hope that it turned out okay, and it went well. I figured I'd share my method in case someone else does what I did and ends up with a purple/maroon color instead of the gray.

First I soaked the suit in the washer with hot water and 2 cups of bleach for 30 minutes, then ran it through the cycle. After doing that the suit was a light brown color. Then I refilled the washer with hot water and added a packet of RIT color remover to the wash, then ran the cycle straight through without any soaking. This time it had a greenish hue to it, but was for the most part gray.

I hit a bit of a snag in this next part. I reloaded the wash, again with hot water, and poured in 1/2 cup of blue dye into the wash, then added the suit. I reset the cycle to run for 30 minutes. After this the suit was starting to turn a nice gray/blue, but was still very light and had some green spots still. I decided to run the wash again (4 washes total) with the remaining 1/2 cup of dye and around 1/2 cup of salt. After running the cycle the suit was nearly perfect. I put it in the dryer for around 20 minutes, and what came out was pretty close to the charcoal gray/blue color I was looking for.

Like I said, this was basically a big trial and error experiment, so by no means should these steps be followed before consulting someone smarter than I at dyeing fabrics. =P
THIS.POST.IS.USELESS.WITHOUT.PICTURES.
By WestNewYorkGB
#263273
so I think I am a little later here..oh yeah hi Guys n Girls , I am Adrian sorta newbie on here but not a stranger to the site, anyway moving on.

so if I get a nomex suit basically your saying don't even bother trying to dye it?
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