This is for other Ghostbusters Props that don't fit into the categories above.
User avatar
By barison82
#4893745
What an absolutely fantastic project, truly inspiring! Suscribed a while back but revisited and read again from the very beginning and was hooked. Can't wait for the next updates, and all the discoveries you guys made along the way with all those obsure, obsolete and rare found parts is mindblowing - that's dedication for you. Awesome stuff! Mentioned a while back was the GB Visual History book, and I remember as I read it for the first time, noting the part where Stephen Dane refers to the aircraft scrapyard in Tucson, where he found all the bits used in the props...well it got me thinking, I wonder which type of aircraft (either military or commercial) were withdrawn/scrapped and sent there by the time he visited? This would have been either late 1981 or early 1982, as he mentioned Bladerunner, which screened in 1982. If the exact types of aircraft were known, then related technical/maintenance manuals could be found, which would reference all the parts...I know this is probably a moot point, since most of the parts have been identified anyway, but I guess I got bitten by the bug after reading about all the in-depth investigative work that's been going on here :)
User avatar
By 910dohead
#4893758
What an absolutely fantastic project, truly inspiring! Suscribed a while back but revisited and read again from the very beginning and was hooked. Can't wait for the next updates, and all the discoveries you guys made along the way with all those obsure, obsolete and rare found parts is mindblowing - that's dedication for you. Awesome stuff! Mentioned a while back was the GB Visual History book, and I remember as I read it for the first time, noting the part where Stephen Dane refers to the aircraft scrapyard in Tucson, where he found all the bits used in the props...well it got me thinking, I wonder which type of aircraft (either military or commercial) were withdrawn/scrapped and sent there by the time he visited? This would have been either late 1981 or early 1982, as he mentioned Bladerunner, which screened in 1982. If the exact types of aircraft were known, then related technical/maintenance manuals could be found, which would reference all the parts...I know this is probably a moot point, since most of the parts have been identified anyway, but I guess I got bitten by the bug after reading about all the in-depth investigative work that's been going on here :)
Thank you for the very kind words (as well as all of the post likes). There is a big post in the works, but I just haven't put the effort into preparing the update yet. My attention has been more focused on updating the plans and creating a definitive parts list. I'm a little over extended on a promise I made so I am trying to wrap that up quickly. Maybe after the next planned build day I will post the picture/video update. I guess I am looking to add a little more meat to the pie first.

The two different places where the parts sourced for the film are the Tucson Airplane scrap yard and APEX in Los Angeles. I have yet to visit the Tucson yard but I have been to APEX several times. While you can find aircraft junk at APEX, it's mostly filled with industrial and electronics pieces. Occasionally you can stumble onto Ghostbusters parts but you're not going to find much. I have been to an aircraft junkyard looking for parts and the stuff we were finding was amazing. Everywhere we turned we were recognizing props. Not just from Ghostbusters but other movies like Star Wars, etc. The place was so awesome and massive! We even needed a golf cart to get around. Unfortunately, the owner of the place was a f****g asshole and kicked us all out. The epitome of a wacky, hoarding-nutjob who I guess felt betrayed that we were even the presence of his precious scrap-pile (long story). Anyways, with that said, I have always wanted to visit another yard like it. I have had my eye set on going out to Tucson and seeing what they've got. I would really like to stumble upon the Ecto-1 heatsink or the GB1 pack cable in the wild someday. Who knows. Maybe we'll get lucky?

As far as the props used in the film go, I don't necessarily think one plane in particular is going to be the end-all find. While there are actually a lot of brand similarities between the equipment, ECU and Ecto-1/1A, some of it comes from completely different sources. Some of it being older than others too. We know the oxygen tanks and other pieces come straight out of WWII era military parts. Then there's Vietnam-era mil-spec, late 70's aerospace parts and even early 80's computer tech. The stuff comes from all over and in a place like that it's all going to be in piles of junk unfortunately. I mean, I was just watching one of the JAWS (I think the 4th one?) films a few weeks ago. I found that the infamously hard-to-find skirted trap knob (that's also used on the ECU) can be sourced from a sonar device that's used on the boat in the film. From some company in Tujunga, CA. where they also filmed E.T. - The Extra Terrestrial. So who knows where this stuff really comes from? I think the best bet is to track the pieces back to the manufacturer. Sometimes you'll discover that they're still manufacturing this stuff. However, if you do some digging in the forums, there are talks about just this and some guys have found pieces in particular planes and do talk about which ones. I'd like to try and find it for you, but it's just before midnight and I am spent.
User avatar
By barison82
#4893762
Thank you for the very kind words (as well as all of the post likes). There is a big post in the works, but I just haven't put the effort into preparing the update yet. My attention has been more focused on updating the plans and creating a definitive parts list. I'm a little over extended on a promise I made so I am trying to wrap that up quickly. Maybe after the next planned build day I will post the picture/video update. I guess I am looking to add a little more meat to the pie first.

The two different places where the parts sourced for the film are the Tucson Airplane scrap yard and APEX in Los Angeles. I have yet to visit the Tucson yard but I have been to APEX several times. While you can find aircraft junk at APEX, it's mostly filled with industrial and electronics pieces. Occasionally you can stumble onto Ghostbusters parts but you're not going to find much. I have been to an aircraft junkyard looking for parts and the stuff we were finding was amazing. Everywhere we turned we were recognizing props. Not just from Ghostbusters but other movies like Star Wars, etc. The place was so awesome and massive! We even needed a golf cart to get around. Unfortunately, the owner of the place was a f****g asshole and kicked us all out. The epitome of a wacky, hoarding-nutjob who I guess felt betrayed that we were even the presence of his precious scrap-pile (long story). Anyways, with that said, I have always wanted to visit another yard like it. I have had my eye set on going out to Tucson and seeing what they've got. I would really like to stumble upon the Ecto-1 heatsink or the GB1 pack cable in the wild someday. Who knows. Maybe we'll get lucky?

As far as the props used in the film go, I don't necessarily think one plane in particular is going to be the end-all find. While there are actually a lot of brand similarities between the equipment, ECU and Ecto-1/1A, some of it comes from completely different sources. Some of it being older than others too. We know the oxygen tanks and other pieces come straight out of WWII era military parts. Then there's Vietnam-era mil-spec, late 70's aerospace parts and even early 80's computer tech. The stuff comes from all over and in a place like that it's all going to be in piles of junk unfortunately. I mean, I was just watching one of the JAWS (I think the 4th one?) films a few weeks ago. I found that the infamously hard-to-find skirted trap knob (that's also used on the ECU) can be sourced from a sonar device that's used on the boat in the film. From some company in Tujunga, CA. where they also filmed E.T. - The Extra Terrestrial. So who knows where this stuff really comes from? I think the best bet is to track the pieces back to the manufacturer. Sometimes you'll discover that they're still manufacturing this stuff. However, if you do some digging in the forums, there are talks about just this and some guys have found pieces in particular planes and do talk about which ones. I'd like to try and find it for you, but it's just before midnight and I am spent.
You're very welcome! And no worries, I'll look forward to seeing all the forthcoming updates, and all the work you guys are contributing to this forum is much appreciated ImageImage

Thanks also for such a detailed reply! Truly fascinating stuff regarding your visits to that scrapyard, such a shame the owner wasn't very accommodating! Those places sound vast and quite surreal. Might have a look on Google Earth! The connections between the parts and all the various movies of that genre/era is also very interesting. It would certainly warrant a book on the subject! Things do have a way of turning up when you least expect, I always think that as long as you look, you will eventually find...

The variety of sources is also interesting and adds to the complexity. Those oxygen tanks being WWII era for example, I mean that is a remarkable vintage. Didn't think it would go so far back! I see what you mean. Tracking by manufacturer makes a lot of sense. In fact I found that skirted trap knob you mention, it's in my own trap build thread, I sourced the white-line pointer knob and the correct black skirt that goes with it. Very interesting that it originates on a Sonar device, and that it shows up in JAWS. My trap build thread is in my sig line and in it, I list the sources of those rare knobs, of which these two:

https://www.tedss.com/2051000492

http://www.surplussales.com/ShaftHardware/Knobs-10.html

have a lot of knobs and switches available, and I had great success finding those tear-drop pointer knobs ImageImage

Interesting as I thought the one used on the ECU was bigger!

Thanks for offering to find that thread but I wouldn't expect you to go out of your way like that lol...I will certainly do some more digging about here as there seems to be a never-ending wealth of information, I'm just learning all the time! What a fantastic hobby. And thanks for your input Image
User avatar
By 910dohead
#4895073
Update time!

The new frame needed a new cover as well as all of the openings to be cut out. A step we've already done twice in this build.

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Now that we already had the instrument panel finished, we decided to go ahead and have that mounted up.

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Here is a picture of the panel looking pretty and ready to be mounted.

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Let's go ahead and get rid of the greeblies so we can put some screws in that lovely piece of aluminum.

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Here she is all mounted up!

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Here is the backside you will never see. Allowing plenty of room for the greeblies to be mounted and eventually wired up.

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Now let's go ahead and put all of those wonderful control knobs back onto the plate. Yes, the microamperes meter you see is not the accurate one. I grabbed the wrong one by accident but it was just for the sake of the test mount and picture purposes.

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Continuing with steps that previously haven't done in the build yet, we decided to mount the card connectors to their final homes. Yes, that's what these are actually called. More specifically, 18-pin card connectors. These ones were made by DALE, who also made the wonderful stuff found on our proton packs.

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This update wouldn't be complete without showing you this. I think the one on the left is the male and the one on the right is the female. He's really giving it to her good. Aww.

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This particular build day was complete, so we decided to take a shot of the unit with the fancy new upgrades.

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Starting a new build day, it was time we mounted the door to the frame. Last time we tried this, we screwed something up and the door wouldn't sit flush when closed. It was a mistake that was so minut but had disastrous consequences for us, so this time we took extra precautions in making sure we get it right. Here you can see we used some old playing cards to keep the barrel hinges evenly spaced so the holes on the frame are in the correct spot they need to be.

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Here is the frame before making our cuts. We had the brackets on the hinges perfectly spaced this time so here goes nothing. Honestly, countersinking the door brackets isn't even the hard part of mounting the door. It's just time consuming. The trick is to drill the holes perfectly precise.

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The hard part comes right about here. We have to make sure the holes that we drill here are perfect. Otherwise, the door will not sit flush against the frame. Screwing this up would mean building the whole entire frame and cover for a third freaking time would have been for nothing. "This is it. Don't get scared now." - Macaulay Culkin.

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Before I get into the part of whether we f**** up on the door or not, I also want to point out that we also countersunk our pilot holes for all of the screws we need to use to mount the cover to the frame. Pretty, right? An extra step and all that extra work wasted if this door doesn't go on right.

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Here we go, the moment of truth!

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It fits and it's flush! The door is now mounted properly. Time to finally move on with the build. Now everything we do from this point on is completely new. What's next you say? Well, let's go ahead and get these thing-a-ma-jigs (not what they are actually called. Give us a break. We threw you a bone with the card connectors) that hold the door up placed where they need to be. Lemme tell ya, finding the sweet spot on these takes forever.

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Once we found the g-spot, we went ahead and mounted them up! OMG! (John Travolta excitement).

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Moving forward, we now come to the part in our build where we take extra precautions in making sure our measurements are correct. We have one custom made aluminum door that we absolutely cannot make mistakes with. Granted, they can be corrected but any would set us back and what a pain in the ass they would be. Anyways, without further ado, let's drill some holes!

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Here is one hole drilled and tapped! Three more to go.

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I can't begin to describe the anxiety we all felt doing these steps. Drilling was one thing, but tapping these holes sucked. We all had to take turns doing these and it killed our hands. Once all four holes were drilled and tapped, we put the whole door together. Is it going to work the way it needs to? Let's find out.



Finally! One of the hardest parts we've encountered so far in this build and it's now beyond us. Thank goodness. Now, let's measure out some more holes and do some more anxiety filled drilling? Shall we? OK, let me explain what is going on in this next picture. This is a reference photo we took of our first draft of figuring out where all of the hex bolts are going to need to go for the ghost trap housing. The bottom row of bolts represents the top of the housing as well as the bottom guides (for the ghost trap wheels) that mount onto the door. The top row, with the five bolts, represents the supports underneath the heatsinks. These also get mounted onto the door. The middle row you see with the 7 bolts was preliminary. We went back to the reference we have and did some heavy scrutinizing on figuring out whether 7 bolts are needed or less. We ultimately discovered that only 5 bolts were needed for the inside of the housing to connect to the support beams. It's the same pattern only slightly offset so the bolts don't end up running into each other while going thru the support.

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I know it sounds confusing, but here in the next steps, you'll see what I mean. Moving forward, let's drill those holes.

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Here you can see the five bolt pattern going into the side of support beam securing the side wall to it. What you are seeing is the backside view of the left side. You can see the support to the right. Additionally, another five hex bolts mount from the top of the support and into the door. They will have to be slightly offset so the bolts going into the sides don't hit each other. It also matches up to the reference as well.

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The left one is done and moving onto the right side. Notice the lines on the support being worked on and look closely at the finished one. Do you notice anything off? Well, on closer inspection you see that he's about to make the mistake of making two left sides. It wasn't caught in time by any of us and we ended up having to remake a new support. You see this is why I say wait until we have our plans done. Let us be the pin cushion and make all of the stupid mistakes for you first. Remember, silly mistakes like this costs extra money.

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Here is a test fit making sure everything still lines up before moving forward. If you look closely at this next picture, you will see the guide rails along the bottom are about a quarter of an inch too short. We did this originally because we had an idea of making something that grabbed onto trap to hold it in place. We figured we would need that clearance to get closer to the front of the trap so it could grab it better. Now, that we have a better idea of how this system worked in the film, we don't need this extra space. So these pieces are going to get re-cut so we have better support for the back housing.

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Here is a shot of the front before the new guide rails.

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Here is (almost) the same shot of the front after the new guide rails.

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Our next step was to drill the holes for the guide rails into the door. However, the drill press that we specifically purchased to do just this wouldn't accommodate the depth we needed to reach where the holes needed to go. I called up my neighbor to see if his drill press would work and luckily it did. Drilling into the door round 2! More nail-biting, nerve-racking hi-jinks ahead.

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Once all 8 holes were drilled, then needed to be tapped and filled (with bolts). Everything looks good at this point.

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This is where we had to stop. We had a calling on consuming large quantities of pizza and beer in our immediate future, so we took haste. You are all now caught up on our progress. We are getting much closer to finally being done with this project. Obviously, we still have some hurdles to cross, but we are making great progress (and hopefully continue to do so).

Before I wrap this up, I am going to go ahead and share another crucial part of this build that's been on-going during the entire project. While it's not completely finished (hence the watermarks), I would like to show off the progress and talk about one thing that's bugging me about it.

I am talking specifically about the labels. Here is my mock up.

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I designed these myself and I am pretty confident they are accurate in size and spacing. Obviously, we still don't know who manufactured the bumper labels so the Toshiba and Motco are just speculation and will obviously be replaced if the actual manufacturer becomes known. I'm probably going to trash the Motco idea too. A promising lead that seems to be leading towards a dead-end. Anyways, the two complete (still) unknown labels are the weird "red bar" stereo(?) label underneath the microamperes meter and the white CAUTION label in the lower right of my template. Recently, I was talking with another ghosthead at a convention who filled me in on the fact that the label is also on the Ecto-1. However, it disappeared after the car's first restoration. Sadly it is a detail completely lost to time. Reference is dismal and you can barely get a glimpse of it on the car in the film.

Here are the two best reference images I have of the label.

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The clearest shot of it seen in the film.

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Finally, the last time we saw them alive.

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Only to be replaced by this ass-hat:

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I think I did a pretty decent job with what I had available. I also did extensive research on similar and actual white caution labels that exist. I know it's not exact. I hope one day, somebody somewhere has a clear image of this paper label lost to time. Honestly, besides the left side of the trap housing, the most glaring inaccuracies on this entire build are going to be these said labels. However, I believe an awesome attempt has been made to recover these missing puzzle pieces. While, it will bug me to no-end, I just hope that when the project is complete and goes on display that the attempt is admired and not trashed. All I need is another über fan to point out their obvious flaws and criticize them not knowing the work, research and dedication that went into creating them. I don't want to think about that. But... BUT! Hopefully with some more digging, I hope we can solve these little mysteries. To one day fill that void, baby! There's gotta be some old dusty behind the scenes pictures laying about? Was your dad a prop builder for BOSS films in the 80's that kept a detailed work scrap book? Throw us a bone. C'mon...

Also, these labels will be released alongside our plans for the ECU.

Anyways, the next update will be more fascinating and will include this kinda stuff:

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Also, extra points to those of you who noticed we started outside, moved to the garage and eventually ended up in the house. It's been consistently 120+ degrees out here.

Until then, Suncheros! (inside joke)
barison82, GothicGeek liked this
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By barison82
#4895085
Wow, awesome update and more amazingly detailed, painstaking work - fantastic. Congrats on getting the door finally mounted correctly! That deserves a :crunch:

Drilling and tapping aluminium can be a nightmare as I'll soon discover when attempting my trap build, but you guys seem to be handling it pretty well so far...and the labels - again, wow, you're tackling some very tough details there but given what there is available to go on in terms of reference material, you've done the best that anyone could do :) Thanks for sharing with the community.

Wow 120+ degrees!? That's major.

Keep up the amazing work though!
910dohead liked this
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By 910dohead
#4895275
Happy July 4th everyone. We spent a few hours working on the unit yesterday so this update will be a small one.

We left off last week by mounting the guide rails on the door for the ghost trap. Since we also mounted the supports to the side walls, the next obvious step would be to mount those side walls and supports to the door. We decided we would drill the holes we needed in the supports first. Then we would clamp everything together to the door, go through those support holes and right into the aluminum. We achieved this by clamping our straight edge to the door. This would ensure the parts would stay where they needed to be and remain flush to each other in the process. Next we used clamps to keep the walls and supports together. Then once everything was in place, we could then line up each hole on the drill press and get those holes into the door.

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Once all of the holes were drilled and tapped we could attach the first side. As you can see, by using the straight edge to keep the pieces in place, we got our parts mounted while still being flush to each other (more importantly on the line).

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We repeated the same steps with the other the wall. Making sure everything lined up to where we wanted it to be.

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Once we had the two sides mounted to the door, we needed to check to see if the top would fit flush. Luckily everything is looking great.

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Mounting the top is going to be very difficult. These holes have to be absolutely perfect. We do have a plan of attack though and we will tackle that next week. In the meantime, we started with the heatsinks that go on the sides of the housing. We found the dead center of the heatsink and drilled the hole for our first greeblie.

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Then it just needed to be tapped and mounted. We did this to both and I thought I took a picture but I guess I didn't.

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That's all that we have for you this week. We will have more progress to show next week. Our plan is to get the top of the housing drilled and mounted. If time permits, we should also be able to build the other have of the housing and have it mounted. Until then.

Have a safe and happy 4th of July.
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By 910dohead
#4895949
Last time we left off we had only built up the side walls of the trap housing. The next step we need to complete is to mount the top of the housing. This requires us drill into the top of the side walls. We have to be careful with the next steps.

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It seems simple to do but this was probably the hardest part of the build. We had little room for screw ups so these holes had to be drilled perfectly.

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Luckily, we did this next step without any issue. Next we tapped the holes and crossed our fingers everything would line up.

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Thankfully, things lined up great but we had a very slight overhang on the sides. Nothing a little sanding couldn't take care of.

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We nailed this part. The trap entrance measures up perfectly and looks great.

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Next we needed to start the back half of the housing. We cut out some beams for support. This is also to secure the top to each wall.

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Here is the finished second half.

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Luckily the housing lines up perfectly with each other. Now to drill and tap the lower support beams to the door.

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The pictures make it look easy but with all the weird angles and having to use a drill press made it difficult. We did the first side without issue.

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However, when we worked on the other side the door it was different story. We pushed through it and finally got the supports mounted. It was stressful but everything is done. Now it's time to put everything back together and check out the results.

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Here it is all assembled. We did have an issue with one of the back walls being slightly off. It ended up creating a gap between the two housing pieces. Basically, the two parts didn't sit flush against each other. The next day we decided to re-cut a new wall piece. Everything went smoothly as we drilled it all together perfectly.

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We are taking a break from the build next week. We are going to assemble the heatsinks as well as the ball joints pieces when we resume. One step closer to paint and completion.

Until next time...
barison82 liked this
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By barison82
#4896166
Looking awesome!! What a complicated project. Had to re-read a few times to understand what was going on with some of those stages lol
910dohead liked this
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By 910dohead
#4896425
Looking awesome!! What a complicated project. Had to re-read a few times to understand what was going on with some of those stages lol
Thanks! Yeah, sorry about that. I rushed the last few updates and even went back and tried to reword the process a little better. It seems like it can be a complicated project (at times it certainly feels that way), but with the headaches aside it really is a fun prop to build. I just wish we had more time to work on it. It's taken how many years to get to this point now? Lol.

We did work on it yesterday but we didn't do much. What we did was tapped the SCR's to the heat sink. I didn't get any action shots of the drilling or tapping. All I took were a few pictures of the after progress.

Yay! All done.
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The side you see in the film. We were very fortunate to get the SCR's to line up exactly how they are seen. Either I meticulously tried to get the threading perfect or I just completely lucked out?
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Comparing it to the reference.
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Finally, a bird's eye view.
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Here's a little advice for anyone wanting to build a ECU based around this thread. If you're planning on using aluminum parts like the heatsinks, real SCR's or even with the real door handle (steel), please construct your door to accommodate the weight. One heatsink with the thyristors attached weighs 3 lbs. Account for everything else and it adds up to being one heavy door.

I think next week we will either try and mount the heatsinks to the housing and possibly get all of the greeblies attached.

Until next time...
barison82 liked this
By brits_abroad
#4899850
I have been scouring the threads to find containment center labels but with little success, several reference old hosted images (long since removed). Or super low resolution ones. Would anybody have a PDF of labels for this unit, my build is very simple and fun for a trunk or treat event but I would like to have the proper labels if possible. I only have a few days or I would try to Photoshop some up myself, my current plan is remake the low resolution ones in Illustrator for clean prints, but hoping somebody saves the day (and my time I am spending hours and hours cutting and folding and gluing :) )
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By barison82
#4900123
No worries! It's great that you're taking the time to record all the steps. Another interesting update and it is certainly a complicated project but yeah, looks great fun! Looking forward to further progress as usual :)
User avatar
By 910dohead
#4900363
No worries! It's great that you're taking the time to record all the steps. Another interesting update and it is certainly a complicated project but yeah, looks great fun! Looking forward to further progress as usual :)
That wasn't an update regarding this project. That was just some random person who only joined the forums to try to get me to hand them over the labels created for this project. It wasn't going to happen for them but I wish them all the best with their Halloween project.

However, if you would like an update for this project, all I can say is that there is nothing to report. The focus and motivation has been shifted elsewhere (again). Personally, I don't know when there's going to be momentum again but there will be at some point in time.

Soooo... Happy Halloween!
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By 910dohead
#4915543
You may have thought this build and/or thread was dead. Well? For a while, that was true. In fact, the last real update was back in August of 2017. That's quite a long time ago and with no update, it would seem as though is was. However, I can tell you that we didn't abandon this project (nor any other group projects for that matter), but we did have to put it on hold for a lengthy period of time. What's the reason? Well, Onlyalad19 and ZuulTheGatekeeper had their wedding to plan. It took place just before Halloween and was a beautiful, fun and splendid affair. There was great music, wonderful people, the theme was awesome (think 1900's-1930's expressionism; specifically film) and my favorite part was the open bar (glug, glug). Congrats to them!

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Now that the holidays are over, it's time to bust this shit out! We're kicking out the jams, mother-fu...

Since resuming, we thought about doing one final/massive post before the finished unveiling. However, while taking a look at what work still needed to be done, we felt like one giant post would be cheating everyone by glazing over details or leaving important stuff out. What I mean is some of the details would be lost by shortening things up. Believe me, these posts usually go through 2 or 3 stages of edits and summarizing before they get posted. We probably have close to a thousand photos of this build so far and we can't show you everything as it would get boring. We've got to show you the stuff that matters and get right to the point with it. A final post would be cramming too much at once. With that said...

Here is the first of several countdown-to-completion posts!

We always thought the hardest part of this build would be mounting the handle to the door. Building it up in our heads that it was going to be one giant headache to overcome. That wasn't the case at all. In fact, everything went smoother than we had thought.

First, we needed to ditch the giant rod/bar that comes out of the handle. Here it is with our final 3D printed handle frame with mock jack dish. A friend of ours made us one out of steel but its just way too heavy to go on the door.

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We thought this process was going to take hours to cut through the steel. We loaded it into our vice and cut it with a hacksaw.

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Luckily, it took less than 2 minutes! It was quite the surprise and that sped the process up for us greatly.

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It actually took us longer to file the backside of the handle down flat for when it gets countersunk in the door.

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Now with all this time on our hands, we used a dremel to sand down the edges of the handle that run along the mounting bracket. The handle is really hard to turn versus what is seen in the film. By sanding it down, it'll reduce the friction along the bracket making the handle easier to turn.

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Here is where we are faced with our dilemma. When I designed the stl file for the handle frame, hole placement for the handle was something we hadn't tackled at that point. Jumping the gun, I designed it anyways. Now that we're at a point where we can mount the handle, that leaves us with two options. Try to cut the hole ourselves or we alter the stl file to include the hole (which I am surprised I was able to design in the first place) and have it 3D printed again. We had a partial test print of the frame and decided to do a test cut.

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Having to cut out the hole to make room for the handle is one thing, but we also had to recess the backside to allow the bracket to sit above the door. It's obviously easier to cut into ABS plastic than it is to cut into aluminum.

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In the end our results weren't what we would consider close to ideal. We still could choose this method. If we failed, we could always alter the stl file and have it re-printed. We did reach out to our friend who originally printed the frame for us, but he could'nt get to it for some time. Therefore we decided to give it a go using a better dremel and slowly taking our time. Here's goes nothing.

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Cutting out the hole was easy. We just had to limit cutting in sections for too long. The plastic could start to heat up and begin warping, which is what we wanted to avoid. Luckily we took our time and got the results we were hoping for.

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We couldn't afford any room for error when cutting this so we took our time with it. When all was said and done, it only took about an hour. Just to give you an idea of why we needed to be delicate with it. It was going to end up being very thin. The smallest mistake would of been catastrophic and had us scrap it.

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Then we got a piece of junk wood and decided to do a test mount of the handle and a test fitting of the frame.

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The way in which this all goes together is we simply slip the frame over the handle. In order to do this we had to make the opening for the handle slightly larger than it should be. The handle has more to it at the curved bend which makes getting the frame over it impossible. We had to slowly sand the opening just enough to where it would fit over. The only other option would be to drill out the rivet pin holding the handle to the bracket, put the base of the handle through the frame and re-rivet it (which I don't think is possible because the rivet looks to be something either proprietary or an older design no longer used). Luckily, the first option worked out great.

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All that's left for the handle is to be mounted onto the door, clean-up, then paint. We're not there just yet, but we're getting to that very soon. It's going to look so good once its on the door.

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Now we're going to go off onto a different direction. When we left off over a year ago, we had just tapped the thyristors and the diode to the heatsinks that go on the sides of the trap enclosure inside of the door. Our next step is to figure out placement of the holes in the phenolic busbars and get those mounted. We turned to our reference and mocked up a guide in photoshop. Now it was time to drill.

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We wanted to get the end holes perfectly lined up and centered with each other since we have a good idea of what the actual function of these found parts actually do. Measure twice, cut once and you'll always get the desired results.

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The busbars mount at the bottom of the heatsinks on both sides using two slotted pan head screws. They're very close to the edge of the heatsinks, so we had to be careful that we weren't too close. So far so good!

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At this point we drilled and tapped the holes to attach the bars to the heatsinks. We only did this for the right side so far.

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For the left side, the drill holes would have to be opposite if we were going to reverse the effect. So, we did this with one of the other busbars, but before we were going to drill the holes into the heatsink, we decided to look at the reference again. This is when we had an "oh shit" moment. Not a bad one, but a fantastic one. However, I will get into that in a few. I want to share a side story but it relates to what we're doing.

Back in September, a few of our group members were doing a public event. At one point, everyone decided to walk-around but I opted to stay back and man the booth. I was approached by someone during that time who loved what we were doing and then introduced themselves as Richard Edlund's personal assistant. As in Richard Edlund who owns and runs Boss Films who designed the props for Ghostbusters including the Containment Unit? Yep. The very same. We got to talking and I told this person about our project. They were happy to help and we exchanged contact info.

I was asked to put together something which explained what we were looking for. That being a shot of the left side of the door opening. Seeing all of the greeblies on the left side of the trap housing. So I did this and put it all together and we shot emails back and forth. At this point, they were going to go thru archives to see if they could dig something up for us. Then one morning, I checked my email and got what would be the final email I would receive.

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Bummer! Not even Boss Films has anything in their archives which shows that side of the unit. I did ask for the persons name who originally built the prop and nobody could remember the guys name unfortunately. So close, yet so far... we could pursue it further but I honestly don't think we'll find anything and it would just be us bothering some poor widow or whomever. A fools errand at this point. However, let me get back to that "Oh, shit" moment.

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Here's a shot of the left side of the trap housing. Take a look at the placement of the heatsink. It's right up against the 1" square aluminum ball spacer mount. Also, take a look at where the orange tubing is going. If you look closely, you can see the red heatshrink tubing start just below the top of the heatsink. When you compare the distance to the visible tubing on the other side, you can tell that its mounted onto the back screw of the busbar.

OK, think of it like this; you have found parts which you are attaching to your prop. If you have two pieces that are identical but opposite or reverse to each other, you do the obvious thing and attach them opposite to each other. In this case, you don't attach them opposite because you can't. You have two identical parts. Two identical heatsinks with the busbars going in the same exact direction.

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Oh, shit! This is why the heatsink is closer to the front. It's flipped and it sits completely reversed on the other side. If you're lost, here is a picture of what we believe the accurate configuration to be.

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If you think about it, it makes complete and total sense and this is how we're mounting the left side going forward. As far as where the greeblies go will forever remain a mystery. If you look at the best reference shot in the film, the housing is at a very odd angle which may be attributed to a filming lense. We have tried to replicate the same angle with our door and this is the best we could come up with.

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Here you can clearly see the thyristor in our shot but if you compare it to the reference, it's either not there or its just out of the shot completely. We did our best to line these shots up in photoshop, but the reference is odd. Things line up perfectly and then they don't line up at all. It's not that we're off, it's just a weird camera angle we can't replicate.

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Here's just a fun thing I did in photoshop.

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In order to be able to move forward, we needed to find some bolts. Particularly an 8/32 slotted pan head screw with a length of 2". These are the bolts that will be attaching the heatsinks to the housing. We went to store after store after store. Nobody carries slotted screws anymore where we live. We had to resort to the internet to get them. We ordered them Friday and luckily they came today (Monday).

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The update was going to stop here, but since the bolts arrived (and haven't posted the update) we ventured onward!

Next we focused on the heatsinks further. Did some more drilling and tapping with the bolts that just arrived. Then we sanded the heatsinks back to a shine.

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Now that every hole for the heatsink is done, we put most of it together to see how its coming along.

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There is still some cleanup work that needs to be done to these parts, but we are done with them for now. Next they'll be mounted to the sides of the trap housing. The top heatsink goes on the left and the bottom will go on the right.

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I believe we are going to be tackling the task of mounting the handle to the door. Work still needs to be done to the frame and the 3D printed parts need some bondo/sanding work.

Until next time.
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