User avatar
By AJ Quick
Moderator
#463945
This is one of those things that I am REALLY surprised we haven't done yet.

Here is the bumper sticker (Scan by Ken Huegel, Volguus of a REAL label from the screen used pack).

Image

This sticker contains a wealth of information about an actual part that exists somewhere out there in the wild. Lets find it. It can't be 'that' hard can it?

Some details about the motor:

-It is synchronous. To put that easily, that means it keeps its time in synch of the frequency that the power generators at the power plant are running. In the US that's 60HZ, or 60 rotations per second, other countries ran at 50hz. Antique motors relied heavily on synchronous time. Alarm clocks and record players used this to maintain speeds and clock rates. (Increase the frequency and the speed would go up).
-It is fairly fast. 1500 rpm at 50hz and 1800 rpm at 60hz.
-It is fairly weak. Only 1/35 HP.
-It has a 100% duty cycle. Which means it can run 24 hours a day 7 days a week without getting too hot or too tired.
-It has a direct magnet (that's what the DM means).
-It has a built in 5 microfarad capacitor, rated at 370 VAC. This is a VERY common sized capacitor for a motor.
-It is 1 Phase, 115 volts. (Meaning it will plug in anywhere in your house).
-Part number 252193. Unfortunately this part number really doesn't yield anything. But it does tell me something I believe. This number is too short and vague for this to be the part number that a generic motor company would assign. I'm guessing this is the part number that the company that USES the motor assigned.

Based on my knowledge and a few hours of research, I have estimated that the size of this motor is between 3.3 inches and 5 inches in diameter. It probably has the capacitor on the outside of the body, though because the capacitor information is on the label, perhaps it is contained in the motor housing.

By my best guess. I believe this motor was used in the following applications:

-Fans, Blower Motors, HVAC, Cooling Fans... etc.
-Possibly a refrigerator condenser fan. Perhaps some other application like an A/C unit.

Ken Huegel (Volguus) notes that the label is also used on the containment unit. He put together this composite image of the label by combining several frames from an original 35mm negative (genius).

Image

You can see the bottom of the label actually includes (most likely) the logo, name and location of the company that built it.

I've been searching for hours and hours, and while I haven't come up with anything (we should be able to find a motor with a similar label), I feel like I've been really close with the 'fan motor' idea. I believe the logo could be possibly the motor companies logo, or the logo of the company that uses the motor (maybe it was made in house too). Does anyone recognize it.. perhaps from an appliance or item from around the house? HVAC, appliance or otherwise?

Ken has put together this rendering of what he thinks the logo looks like:

Image

Lets find this sucker!
User avatar
By AJ Quick
Moderator
#463947
Another thing I wanted to look at (but this probably means nothing).

The 1/35 HP rating is equal to 21.29 watts. The electricity input is equal to 115VAC * 0.65 AMP = 74.75 watts.

Making the motor have an efficiency of 28.5%. I don't know if that's useful, but perhaps someone can find data that compares the average electric motor efficiency vs. year to see about when such a motor would have been built. Could have been anywhere from the 50s - 80s.

EDIT: This efficiency seems to correlate directly with a "Shaded Pole" design motor.
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User avatar
By AJ Quick
Moderator
#463948
Here is a similar motor I have found. "Hurst Motors" has been making motors since the 40's / 50's. They have a particular motor called the "Honey Bee" that shares most of the characteristics of the 'bumper motor'.

http://www.hurst-motors.com/documents/M ... nch_RH.pdf

1/35HP, 1800 RPM, Capacitor, Synchronous.. etc.

Other companies I have been looking at include:

Bodine Motors - I've seen a few similar motors.

A.O. Smith - This catalog could contain very useful information: http://www.electricmotorwarehouse.com/P ... ration.pdf

FASCO - A few similar motors.

Dayton - Similar.

Rotom - Similar.

Boran - Blue labels.
User avatar
By julz
#463950
I LOVE THIS PLAN!!!

I'm excited to be apart of it! :cool:
User avatar
By Alex41
#464131
Everything I've run across so far points to this being an A/C blower motor. The voltage and RPM all fit and most of the motors I've found ask for a capacitor rating that is on this label.


More to come.
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User avatar
By AJ Quick
Moderator
#464134
Baldor motors seem to have labels similar to other warning labels on the pack.
While I agree some of the red labels can be similar, I don't think they would match the text on the label.

We'll have to give those ones a shot next if this works out.
By gdonovan
#464144
-It is synchronous. To put that easily, that means it keeps its time in synch of the frequency that the power generators at the power plant are running. In the US that's 60HZ, or 60 rotations per second, other countries ran at 50hz. Antique motors relied heavily on synchronous time. Alarm clocks and record players used this to maintain speeds and clock rates. (Increase the frequency and the speed would go up).

-It is fairly fast. 1500 rpm at 50hz and 1800 rpm at 60hz.
1) I work with A LOT of HVAC motors, none I have changed out have been synchronous, for heating and a/c work its not important. Who cares if the blower speed is 1500 or 1550? No one. Matter of fact the one I was working on was speed adjustable by the user.

2) For heating and a/c work 1500-1800 rpm is nothing, fairly slow speed actually.

The fact that it is synchronous indicates steady speed is important, I'd look at clock type applications or even some sort of pole light timers. 1/35 hp is a pretty weak sister of a motor, I just looked at a wallpack heating unit on Wednesday and it ran 1800 rpm at 115 volt and was 1/12 hp. Motor was roughly 4-5" across and 4" tall.

It is intresting that it indicates that there is a cap present, not sure what to make of that for such a weak motor. Most caps with that rating are about the size of a pack of cigs or a large pill bottle of the round type.

Edit- One application that popped in my head was an oil furnace- They require a very steady speed since the nozzle size is fixed. 100% DC should not be a requirement though and my own furnace has no cap nor does any of the Beckett burners I have handled. Most of them are larger since they have to drive the oil pump.

Most of the stuff I have looked up in that HP range are bathroom blowers or other low hp applications.

I have several books at work I can check on Monday. Of course this motor just might be from some industrial application we can't imagine (running some sort of timer for conveyor belt for example) but just figuring out who made it will get us in the right direction.
By gdonovan
#464145
FYI- I'd lean towards looking at "ROBBINS & MYERS" since the decals tend to be blue and white and they did/do a lot of synchronous motors for industrial applications.

Just had a dumb idea- What runs in Hollywood at a steady speed but doesn't need a lot of HP? Film projectors.

Bodine motor that runs at 1800 rpm at 60hz which is the standard in the US, 1/30 hp

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Bodine- ... 19e2f85afa
User avatar
By Demon Vice Commander
#4795898
I figured I should "bump" the Bumper label thread...

It's not much, but I was doing a bit of searching and came up with some parallels in regard to the Superior Electric Company:

Image
The font for "SYNCHRONOUS" is very close to that found on the Bumper label.




Image
This label also has the same font as above, and is similar in shape to the Bumper label.
User avatar
By 910dohead
#4795928
I've been looking for this label lately too because it would make a nice addition to the containment unit that my group is building. I also came across auctions for Superior Electric and was looking closely at their vintage fans. While there were a few on eBay to look at, none of them had the right voltage, amps, etc. Superior Electric is probably the manufacturer since they have a few black labels that are very close to the screen label. Their logo doesn't look to be what matches the screen used label, but that image is also a composite of screen shots. Who knows? Their logo also appears to have gone unchanged for several decades. However, i'm looking into another lead which may not be anything but I felt it was worth looking into.

Here is an image from a motor that's 100 volts (close) and has an RPM rating of 1500/1800 RPM.

Image
Image

Shiba Electric is short for Shibaden which mainly manufactured audio/video equipment.

Here's is what their logo looked like:

Image

The reason why i've been looking into this is because they were known for their reel-to-reel video/audio equipment. If you aren't too familiar with what those are they're basically a giant cassette tape that uses synchronous motors to turn the reel. Particularly motors that aren't very powerful but are able to go all day long if they need to. It should also be noted that some of these machines also used control knobs that are very close matches to ones used in some of the various GB1 props like the traps and containment unit. Their logo also doesn't match up to the composite image. Their video recorders also used blower motors with small fans on them to keep the device cool.



I imagine these were awesome to have in the 60's but probably garbage if they broke down and needed repair. Probably enough that would end up rotting in a surplus yard throughout the 70's/80's?

Like I stated before, it may or may not be worth looking into?
User avatar
By ectotwinkie
Supporting Member
#4813995
Hi All,

Could it be...

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Save one for me if you find the actual one :)
I've emailed Toshiba to get their help - I'll let you know what they say...

ET
User avatar
By ectotwinkie
Supporting Member
#4826546
Hi All,

Got a reply from Toshiba...

[16/10/2014]

Thank you for your recent e-mail to Toshiba.

This is Toshiba Corporation Customer Information Center.

In reply to your inquiry, we have been examined, but unfortunately
the product you mentioned is very old, so we couldn’t specify the
right section.
We apologize to be unable to help. We appreciate your cooperation.

Yours Sincerely,

??????????????????
TOSHIBA CORPORATION
CUSTOMER INFORMATION CENTER
§ mail:answer@toshiba.co.jp
??????????????????


---------------------- Your Message ----------------------
"Hello,
I am trying to ID a motor label that I believe could be an old
Toshiba motor.

This is the technical information from the label, followed by links
to images of the label:

Motor-synchronous (DM)
continuous duty
1/35 H.P., 1PH.,
1500/1800 R.P.M.
CAP. 5MFD 370VAC

Thermal Protected
115V.A.C., 50/60HZ
.75/.65 AMPS

Insulation Class B
Part No. 252193

Two images:
(The blurred image shows, I believe, the old Toshiba logo)

Any help to identify this label and the product it belongs to would
be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your time,
Kind Regards"

- An archives department that doesn't deal with stuff that's 'very old' :) but it was neat they replied. Thank you Toshiba!
______________________________________________________________________________

Research images...
Image

Image

______________________________________________________________________________

I made up a label and blurred it, to try and replicate the image by Ken Huegel (Volguus) at the beginning of the topic...
(size reduced)
Image

The quest continues...

ET
By cray
#4826750
This might be ridiculous, but has anyone tried contacting Stephen Dane about this? He might know something (assuming anyone here knows how to contact him.....), or maybe even have some old ones sitting around in his files, if we're lucky.
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User avatar
By Sephiroth
#4826782
This might be ridiculous, but has anyone tried contacting Stephen Dane about this? He might know something (assuming anyone here knows how to contact him.....), or maybe even have some old ones sitting around in his files, if we're lucky.
I was actually thinking of asking him this very question myself when I read over this thread a few days ago. I'm friends with Stephen Dane on Facebook, so I sent him a message to politely ask the question and attached a reference pic of the label. It's doubtful he will remember such a small prop detail after 30 years and I don't when or even if he will provide a response, but I believe it's worth a shot.
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User avatar
By ectotwinkie
Supporting Member
#4826790
This might be ridiculous, but has anyone tried contacting Stephen Dane about this? He might know something (assuming anyone here knows how to contact him.....), or maybe even have some old ones sitting around in his files, if we're lucky.
Not ridiculous, great idea. May have unpublished, detailed set pics.
User avatar
By 910dohead
#4826795
Wasn't Stephen Dane mainly responsible for Ecto-1? I've never heard about him having worked on the containment unit or proton packs. Regardless, it's worth a shot. I tried e-mailing last year to inquire about a few parts on the Ecto-1 and got no response. It would be cool if he had an answer. Also, there is a pretty good chance that there might be clues or even an answer in that Ghostbusters Ultimate Visual History book that's coming out later this year. I just hope that there are some awesome, unseen, detailed pictures of some of the lesser seen props (including the containment unit). Cross your fingers!
ectotwinkie liked this
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