#4947649
This is it, the big dive has started with the creation of a single part! This will be a slow burn thread, but I wanted to get it started to get myself in the mindset. I'm working off of Quentin Machiel's Mk 2.1 files over on Thingiverse (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4621554). I'm building a GB1 hero pack, though not necessarily perfectly screen accurate or aimed at any one character. Instead, my goal is "accurate," in the sense that it'll fool pretty much anyone, and will instead be "mine." Generic might be the right term to use.

I picked up some new tools for this, too. Ended up getting a new oscillating multitool to speed up sanding, and I'm gonna try a hot stapler to reinforces seams on the bigger pieces.

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Got delayed getting started by some printer problems. Replaced the hot end, and gave the ion arm a try. Yes, I probably should have started with something smaller, but, well, I'm an idiot and sometimes it shows. Anyway...

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Looks like the new hot end made all the difference. First piece off the plate after running unattended overnight, and it came out perfectly.
#4947872
Small update today. A little progress, but I'm about to start in on bigger stuff, most of which takes about a day per part to print. I did just put in an order for most of the detail pieces. Using real elbows, resistors, brass bits, and that stuff. I also roped in a buddy to print the Clippard 701 and 331 and the crank generator knob in resin for me for better detail.

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Just trying to run out a short roll of PLA with some of the smaller bits. Ion arm is after two rounds of sanding and primer. I think one more round will get it pretty well. To the left is the Hydrogen Gas Accumulator and the hose mount for the synch generator.

Questions for anyone with time to answer:
  1. Is there a good break down of the differences between the GB1 & 2 hero packs? Most of the best photo reference out there is all of the GB2 packs, which I know were mostly updated GB1 packs, but I just want to be sure I'm okay on some of my details (I'm aiming for a GB1 pack, but I'm not against cross pollinating where it makes sense)
  2. Similarly, is there a break down of the differences between the character's packs? I know Egon's pack in particular had several specific things specific to it. I'll probably mix and match details I like, but I'd also like to know what I'm mixing and matching
  3. Aluminum for the motherboard: 5052 or 6061? 3.2mm or 6.3mm? (I'm thinking 3.2mm 6061)
  4. What about building a pack do you wish you'd known early on?
  5. Is there any part of my process I can document in detail for you to be helpful?
Some Advice:
Get yourself a pack of silver sharpies so that you can mark what each part is as you print. The Q Pack has a TON of pieces, and keeping track of them all is gonna be hard. You'll be glad you left yourself notes as you're finishing parts.
#4947885
1. This is a good thread for differences, not a ton of detailed shots of the GB 1 packs but it does highlight the differences. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=28595
2. The reference section has a lot of good pictures of the different packs like the lobby, Minnesota, Spengler etc.
3. On the build I’m doing now I cut my mobo out 1/8” 6061.
4. To be patient with how long it takes to find the right parts (if you’re going the vintage route) and to be okay with using modern equivalents if you can’t source/afford the old ones. There are several vintage parts I’d love to have but don’t due to either not being able to find them or the prohibitive cost when I did find them. This delayed the building of my pack because I wasn’t willing to settle and kept searching. But at a certain point I realized that those parts were not worth holding up the build when modern parts would fill the same role and should I find those parts later on I could easily swap them.
#4948228
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The top of the booster box is my first "big" piece off the printer. From here on out, pretty much everything coming off it is in the 14+ hour window.

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In the mean time, I started ordering some of the smaller detail parts. I didn't want to print this stuff. Good, "real" details will help hide faults in my bigger print areas by drawing the eye. Also, you might note I went with the GB2 cable instead of GB1. This was mostly a choice of convenience.

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Printing the bottom of the booster box. Quentin suggests that almost everything can be printed without supports. I got paranoid though and added some for this piece.

Uh oh.

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No... wait... maybe this will work out okay after all. Gonna roll the dice and let it ride.

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Success! Despite my overly cautious approach nearly blowing the print, it survived (with some mess on the inside).

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Starting to lay out some parts after completing the power cell. It might actually start to look like something soon. I'm already behind on sanding.

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Let's put some stuff together. Starting with the booster box, I hit it with some 5 minute epoxy.

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Then I lined up the top of the booster, and used toothpicks as registration guides. Add clamps, wait. Top left you can also see the hose connector with the magnetic back plate drying. I flipped it upside down and used the magnets as "clamps"

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You didn't think I was gonna trust glue alone, right? After the epoxy set, I followed in behind with M3 screws and nuts. You can probably get away without nuts on these if you wanted, but I have them, so I might as well over engineer it. I'm also not done securing it yet. This stuff will never come apart when I'm done, trust me.

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Before getting to the final reinforcement, I hit the front with some filler on the seam and on a bad spot up top just to get a head start so it can dry and be ready for a first sanding soon. I only filled the very top of the sides, since they are mostly hidden by other parts. I don't plan on wasting time finishing stuff that you can't see.

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I also got the two pieces of the bumper printed and sanded the connection point a little. It fits quite tight and stable.

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Same treatment. Doped the joint up with epoxy, set it flush, and followed behind with filler.
#4948260
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Here we go. My secret weapon to seam stability, the hot stapler! Basically a soldering iron type setup - big box with a temperature knob, and a tool connected to that that gets really hot. Jam a staple in the end, push the button, instant red hot. No touchy the glowy bits.

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This is the back of the bumper after three staples. You can see the epoxy that I'd used as well. I know some folks have complained about flex in the bumper, but I'll tell you, mine is about as stable as a single piece of plastic after all this. It sure as heck won't ever come apart, and the extra mechanical attachment should help prevent any future cracking of the seam filler.
#4948335
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Just testing some part alignment as I go (I do this a lot because I get paranoid). You can see I've hit the booster with a coat of filler primer and second round of filler on some big areas. I've sort of unintentionally decided I'm just going upper left to lower right on my part order.

Questions for anyone with time to answer:
  1. For the textured paint, do you like ceiling texture, or truck bed liner?
  2. Favorite edge weathering technique: toothpaste, masking fluid, vaseline, other?

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